Torture is in the Eye of the Beholder: House of Reps Bans Waterboarding

 

When they aren’t too busy voting about how much they like Christ, it looks like the House of Representatives can actually do something right.  They passed a bill on Thursday that bans the C.I.A. from using waterboarding, mock executions and other harsh interrogation methods.  While the bill still has to pass the Senate, the White House has already predictably threatened to veto.

The White House threatened to veto the measure this week in a lengthy statement, highlighting more than 11 areas of disagreement with the bill.

The administration particularly opposes restricting the CIA to interrogation methods approved by the U.S. military in 2006. That document prohibits forcing detainees to be naked, perform sexual acts, or pose in a sexual manner; placing hoods or sacks over detainees’ heads or duct tape over their eyes; beating, shocking, or burning detainees; threatening them with military dogs; exposing them to extreme heat or cold; conducting mock executions; depriving them of food, water, or medical care; and waterboarding.

Yep, you read that right.  The White House didn’t like the part that said we can’t force prisoners to perform sexual acts while wearning nothing but hoods over their heads and having a military dog barking at their exposed genitals.  When he don’t consider “beating, shocking, or burning detainees” as torture, it’s no wonder Bush can say that America doesn’t torture.

House Passes Ban on Waterboarding – [CBSNews.com]

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2 Responses

  1. We don’t, however, know exactly which parts of the bill the White House disagrees with because the majority of the bill is classified. Revealing only certain parts of the bill is deceptive because we naturally assume that the White House thinks these forms of torture are okay, and that’s why they’re vetoing it. But until we know the full extent of the bill (which we probably never will because of its classified nature), we can only guess which aspects the White House doesn’t approve.

  2. Well, the part that says “the administration particularly opposes restricting the CIA to interrogation methods approved by the U.S. military in 2006,” leads me to believe that the part of the bill the White House primarily disagrees with is “restricting the CIA to interrogation methods approved by the U.S. military in 2006.”

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